About

Matt Niebuhr is an artist and architectural designer living and working in Des Moines, Iowa.

.../miscellaneous - is a personal journal, self educational in nature, containing notes and images that inspire me, or that I wish to learn more about - as such, it includes works by other people as noted with full acknowledgment and credit to authors and sources where possible.

I also share content of my own making that I think is worth sharing with a larger audience. If there is any work by others who object to having their work posted here, I will remove the content if so requested.

Visit Matt Niebuhr - Works a site featuring my work exclusively. I established a studio practice pursuing personal work in the summer of 2012 named "West Branch Studio". In 2013 I became a contributing artist and designer with RDG Dahlquist Art Studio and RDG Planning and Design, a multidisciplinary design firm.

Matt Niebuhr - Drawings a visual journal of my work.

If you are interested in work(s) for purchase please see this or simply email me: niebuhr.matt [at] gmail.com.

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I made these drawings inspired by the conceptual art of Sol LeWitt - and the notion that “objects are perishable and ideas need not be”.   The instructions followed are below:
 
What I find interesting, is that while the instructions may be relatively clear, the outcome is relatively unpredictable and never the same. The object (drawing) is in the end quite unique in circumstance. It’s the draftsman’s hand that makes the idea visible. And of course with no other guidance from the author of the idea, a number of choices are made by the hand that executes the idea.  
There are questions of authenticity here that I would like to consider further,  as well as authorship.  I do not claim to be the owner of the idea, the idea is not mine, but I am the owner of the results - and the decision maker with regards to the way the instructions are executed…  
Instructions: Make four, 4’ x 4’ squares and within each square, make 4” straight hand drawn lines. For each square, use one of four colors: black, red, yellow and blue, one color in each square. Make the lines in each square for 4 hours and for 4 consecutive days.
Black, red, yellow and blue are the four colors which form the basis for all other color.
The texture of each drawing is the result of a variation in line weight. It is the evidence of my hand and the difficulty of drawing each line exactly the same. As each drawing progressed, it became more difficult to stoop over and make the lines straight and uniform near the middle of the drawing as I intended. Therefor, midway from the bottom, I flipped each drawing upside down and proceeded to start again from the new top of drawing to meet in the middle.
Larger images of the results may be found here on my website.

I made these drawings inspired by the conceptual art of Sol LeWitt - and the notion that “objects are perishable and ideas need not be”.   The instructions followed are below:

inspiration (after a proposal for a wall drawing, Information Show by Sol LeWitt 

What I find interesting, is that while the instructions may be relatively clear, the outcome is relatively unpredictable and never the same. The object (drawing) is in the end quite unique in circumstance. It’s the draftsman’s hand that makes the idea visible. And of course with no other guidance from the author of the idea, a number of choices are made by the hand that executes the idea.  

There are questions of authenticity here that I would like to consider further,  as well as authorship.  I do not claim to be the owner of the idea, the idea is not mine, but I am the owner of the results - and the decision maker with regards to the way the instructions are executed…  

Instructions: Make four, 4’ x 4’ squares and within each square, make 4” straight hand drawn lines. For each square, use one of four colors: black, red, yellow and blue, one color in each square. Make the lines in each square for 4 hours and for 4 consecutive days.

Black, red, yellow and blue are the four colors which form the basis for all other color.

The texture of each drawing is the result of a variation in line weight. It is the evidence of my hand and the difficulty of drawing each line exactly the same. As each drawing progressed, it became more difficult to stoop over and make the lines straight and uniform near the middle of the drawing as I intended. Therefor, midway from the bottom, I flipped each drawing upside down and proceeded to start again from the new top of drawing to meet in the middle.

Larger images of the results may be found here on my website.